Henry John-Alder

Professor and Chair

ENR 152A
(848) 932-1064
henry@aesop.rutgers.edu


I am interested in the general area of ecological and evolutionary physiology and endocrinology: the study of functional traits of organisms, their underlying (endocrine) regulation, and the significance of their variation in the natural world. I have investigated organismal energetics, thermal physiology, exercise performance capacities, and growth regulation, and I have included studies on thyroidal, gonadal, and adrenal endocrine systems. My general approach crosses traditional levels of biological organization from biochemical to behavioral and includes a blend of laboratory and field research. I stress the importance of field experiments solidly grounded in natural history. RESEARCH STATEMENT

Recent Publications:

Carsia, R. V., P. McIlroy, R. M. Cox, M. Barrett, and H. B. John-Alder.  2012.  Effects of food restriction on steroidogenesis in dispersed adrenocortical cells from Yarrow’s Spiny Lizard (Sceloporus jarrovii).  Gen. Comp. Endocrinol.  178:306-313.

Golinski, A., H. John-Alder, and L. Kratochvíl. 2011. Male sexual behavior does not require testosterone in a lizard (Coleonyx elegans, Eublepharidae). Horm. Behav. 59: 144-150
                      
John-Alder, H.B., R.M. Cox, G.J. Haenel, and L.C. Smith.  2009.  Hormones, performance, and fitness: insights from natural history and endocrine experiments on a lizard (Sceloporus undulatus).  Int. Comp. Biol.  49(4): 393-407.

Carsia, R. V., P. McIlroy, R. M. Cox, M. Barrett, and H. B. John-Alder.  2008.  Gonadal modulation of adrenal steroidogenesis in Sceloporus lizards.  Gen. Comp. Endocrinol.  158:202-210.

Cox, R. M., V. Zilberman, and H. B. John-Alder.  2008.  Testosterone stimulates the expression of a social color signal in Yarrow’s Spiny Lizard, Sceloporus jarroviiJ. Exp. Zool.  309A: 505-514.

Carsia, R. V., R. M. Cox, M. Barrett, P. McIlroy, and H. B. John-Alder.  2008.  Adrenal steroidogenesis in reptiles: insights from dispersed adrenocortical cells from Sceloporus lizards.  Pages 57-88 IN: Recent Advances in Non-Mammalian Adrenal Gland Research.  Ed. A. Capaldo.  Research Signpost, Kerala, India.

Cox, R.M., M.M. Barrett, and H.B. John-Alder.  2008.  Effects of food restriction on growth, energy allocation, and sexual size dimorphism in Yarrow's Spiny Lizard, Sceloporus jarrovii. Canadian Journal of Zoology.  86:268-276.

Cox, R.M. and H. B. John-Alder.  2007.  Increased mite parasitism as a cost of testosterone in male striped plateau lizards Sceloporus virgatusFunctional Ecology 21: 327-334

John-Alder, H. B., R. M. Cox, and E. N. Taylor.  2007.  Proximate developmental mediators of sexual dimorphism in size: case studies from squamate reptiles.  Integrative and Comparative Biology.  47:258-271.

Cox, R.M. and H.B. John-Alder.  2007.  Growing apart together: the development of contrasting sexual size dimorphisms in sympatric Sceloporus lizards. Herpetologica.  63: 245-257.

Cox, R. M., M. A. Butler, and H. B. John-Alder.  2007.  The evolution of sexual size dimorphism in reptiles.  Pages 38-49 IN: Sex, Size, and Gender Roles: Evolutionary Studies of Sexual Size Dimorphism.  Eds. D. J. Fairbairn, W. U. Blanckenhorn, and T. Szekely.  Oxford Univ. Press. Oxford, UK.

John-Alder, H. B. and R. M. Cox.  2007.  Development of sexual size dimorphism in lizards: testosterone as a bipotential growth regulator.  Pages 195-204 IN: Sex, Size, and Gender Roles: Evolutionary Studies of Sexual Size Dimorphism.  Eds. D. J. Fairbairn, W. U. Blanckenhorn, and T. Szekely.  Oxford Univ. Press, Oxford, UK.

Courses Taught:

11:704:360. ANIMAL PHYSIOLOGICAL ECOLOGY (3) Prerequisites: 01:119:101-102. Organism-environment interactions with emphasis on the limitations that the physical environment places on normal function. Focus on responses of animals, including man, to extreme environments.

Rutgers School of Environmental and Biological Sciences | [Department of Ecology, Evolution, and Natural Resources]